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The Square Guide

The set square is used to ensure the accuracy of layout lines and cuts made with other tools. It must always be accurate because otherwise subsequent work will result in lower levels of work quality. Uses The set square is one of the most important tools used in making furniture. It is used for marking…

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Setting Up a Square

Checking the Square is Accurate-Step 1

To check if your square is accurate, you can use a piece of paper or card stock as, due to their manufacturing techniques, they are very accurately square. Put your square on the long side of the paper and draw down one side of the beam, either using a knife or a sharp pencil. Then…

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Buying a Square

Paul Sellers recommends a 12” (300mm) combination square as this should be suitable for almost all woodworking projects. He finds the try squares don’t remain accurately square as with the better quality combination square. When buying a square, look out for one with a cast iron head as the ones with aluminium heads tend to…

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Using a Combination Square

Once you are confident your square is set up you align the head (stock) against the straight edge of the wood and use a pencil or a woodworker’s knife to mark the 45/90° angle. To move the head along the beam, turn the adjustment wheel to loosen the head, this enables it to be moved, when…

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Using Registration Faces

For this exercise, you will need: Plane Knife Square Pencil Plane down two adjacent surfaces so that they are flat and straight and square to one another. These are now your ‘registration faces’ and will be the faces you register the stock of the square against each time. Mark them with a face mark and…

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Truing Stock

For this exercise you will need: Wood (size will be dependent on the project you are working on) Plane Steel Rule Winding Sticks (you can make them using this video or you can use the ‘poor mans’ version Paul uses in this guide) Pencil Square Gauge All stock must be trued before joinery to establish the…

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General Tool/ Accessories Guide

Eraser This is used alongside the pencil to remove layout lines. Pencil lines are useful to have when constructing the project but the eraser can then be used to remove them once the project has been assembled. Paul likes the Staedtler eraser as it has no rubber in it. We purchased this from Amazon for…

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Dovetail Troubleshooting

We opened up our postbox to anyone who wants to send in one of their first dovetail to get advice as to why it may not be the standard they had hoped for. One of our members, Jenny, sent in her dovetail in return for feedback from Paul which he critiqued in his YouTube video.…

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How to Make a Dovetailed Box

This project will develop your dovetailing accuracy as it requires you to cut multiple dovetails. For this course you will need: Wood (Trued Stock): – Ends (x2): ½ “ (13mm) x 3 ½ “ (89mm) x 5” (127mm) – Sides (x2): ½ “ (13mm) x 3 ½ “ (89mm) x 11” (279mm) – Lid/Base (x2):…

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Spokeshave Control

For these exercises you will need: 1x piece of wood approximately ¾” thick (19mm), 4” wide (100mm), 16” long (400mm) 2x 1” (25mm) panel pins (finish nails USA) Pencil Spare thin piece of wood (thin enough to bend gently without snapping) 3/16” thick (5mm), ¾” (19mm) wide, same length as your main piece of wood.…

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