Checking the Square is Accurate-Step 1

To check if your square is accurate, you can use a piece of paper or card stock as, due to their manufacturing techniques, they are very accurately square. Put your square on the long side of the paper and draw down one side of the beam, either using a knife or a sharp pencil. Then…

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Once you are confident your square is set up you align the head (stock) against the straight edge of the wood and use a pencil or a woodworker’s knife to mark the 45/90° angle. To move the head along the beam, turn the adjustment wheel to loosen the head, this enables it to be moved, when…

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Paul Sellers recommends a 12” (300mm) combination square as this should be suitable for almost all woodworking projects. He finds the try squares don’t remain accurately square as with the better quality combination square. When buying a square, look out for one with a cast iron head as the ones with aluminium heads tend to…

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The set square is used to ensure the accuracy of layout lines and cuts made with other tools. It must always be accurate because otherwise subsequent work will result in lower levels of work quality. Uses The set square is one of the most important tools used in making furniture. It is used for marking…

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